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L’ACQUA: Proposal for a building  on a campus for research and education on water

Design team: Ana Rolim, Erica Costa, Robson Canuto, Rodrigo Malvim, and Allyson Pimentel

Our proposal wants to blur the limits between architecture and landscape by establishing an active connection between nature and building, different than the separate relationship  - slab x nature - occurring in predominantly modernist buildings on campus.

The program consists mainly of laboratories, classroom, auditorium, restaurant, and community center on ground level, The briefing called for a building dedicated to the research and public outreach in regards to education on issues involving water.

Our response was to create a slim tower that intersects with water on its West façade, where a waterfall cascades down the upper floor onto a reflective pool on ground level, an extension of the existing Cavouco Creek. The building links the campus with a busy street at North through a pedestrian bridge on ground level: A shaded and cool walkway that floats over water, leading to bridges with decks, becoming a much needed public space in a beautiful section of the campus that nowadays lacks infrastructure.

Overall view with building and bridges that operate as new connections to open spaces

Site plan showing ground floor

The site is located at the source of the Cavouco Creek, a condition that drives our design approach

Diagram of the proposed active relationship between water and building, a criticism to the sterile modernist slab typical on campus

Plan and section sustainability diagrams

Exterior view showing West elevation with corten steel screen

The walkway leads to the edge of the building where water cascades down to the reflective pool below

Floor Plans: a slim open plan tower with laboratories and social spaces at ground and upper floors

The West side walkway allows for great views of the surroundings

North-South perspective section

The proposed bridge over the Cavouco Creek strengthens the connection between campus and city

A slice through the volume gives it a dramatic effect and marks the active relationship with the site.

 by Ana Rolim.